Continuing on with the Silversea cruise to Greenland, the ship crossed the Davis Strait and made port calls on the mainland of Canada and the large island on Newfoundland. This area is bordered by parts of the Atlantic Ocean, so I am referring to it as the Atlantic Provinces of Canada.

  Nunavut is the newest, largest, and most northerly province of Canada; it was separated officially from the Northwest Territories on April 1, 1999, and includes the entire archipelago between Greenland and North America as well as all of the islands in Hudson Bay. Nunavut means "our land" in the native language Inuktitut, thereby honoring the mostly Inuit population. The capital is the town of Iqaluit, and the economy is primarily based on mining, oil and mineral exploration, arts and crafts, hunting and fishing, and tourism. The province is not connected to the rest of Canada by highway and overland travel is challenging, to say the least. We landed at Iqaliut and then did 'scenic cruising' of several islands to the south and the coastline of Labrador by ship and zodiac but did not set foot on land again until the World Heritage site of Red Bay in Labrador.

  Labrador was named after João Fernandes Lavrador, a Portuguese explorer, who probably sighted the land in 1498-99. Less that 50 years later, Basque mariners came ashore at a natural harbour on the north east coast of the Strait of Belle Isle at the very southern tip of Labrador.  A whaling station was set up around the bay, now named Red Bay after the red terracotta roof tiles they brought with them. Between 1550 and the early 17th century, it was a centre for Basque whaling operations. Sailors from southern France and northern Spain sent 15 whaleships and 600 men each season to the remote outpost to try to catch the right whales and bowhead whales that populated the waters there. A whaling ship, the San Juan, sank there in 1565 and was raised in 1978; several other whaling ships have been located in the bay. In recognition of the significance of the site, Red Bay was named a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2013. The village today has less than 200 residents and probably fewer visitors.

  Newfoundland is a roughly triangular island separated from Labrador by the Strait of Belle Isle, and the two regions are joined together as Canada's most easterly province. Human habitation in Newfoundland and Labrador can be traced back about 9,000 years; but by the time of European contact, only one tribe, the Beothuk, were still living on Newfoundland. The oldest confirmed accounts of European contact date from a thousand years ago as described in the Norse Viking Icelandic Sagas. Around the year 1001, the sagas refer to Leif Ericson landing in three places to the west, the first two being Helluland (possibly Baffin Island) and Markland (possibly Labrador). Leif's third landing was at a place he called Vinland (possibly Newfoundland). Archaeological evidence of a Norse settlement was found in L'Anse aux Meadows, Newfoundland, which was declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1978. The site is well-maintained, with a staff of re-enacters during the tourist season living on-site and practicing the arts and crafts, and cooking and woodworking in the reconstructed buildings.

  This cruise to the little-visited areas of Greenland and Atlantic Canada was focused on the scenery of the lands and sea, the lifestyles of early settlers and current natives, and the history of this corner of the world. The bleak barrenness of the land and the power of the sea were awesome in their own way and I came away with a renewed respect for people who live here.

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13 Sep 2016.......Iqaluit, Nunavut, Canada

14 Sep................Monumental Island – Lady Franklin Island, Nunavut, CA

15 Sep................Lower Savage Islands – Resolution Island, Nunavut, CA

16 Sep................Akpatok Island, Nunavut, CA

17 Sep................Cruising the Labrador Sea

18 Sep................Cruising the Labrador Sea

19 Sep................Red Bay, Labrador, CA – L’Anse aux Meadows, Newfoundland, CA

20 Sep................Twillingate, Newfoundland, CA

21 Sep................St John’s, Newfoundland  YYT — Toronto, Ontario YYZ

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WORLD HERITAGE SITES

Red Bay Whaling Station

L'Anse Aux Meadows

IQALUIT, NUNAVUT, CANADA— capital and only city in Nunavut, with about 8000 inhabitants
IQALUIT, NUNAVUT, CANADA— capital and only city in Nunavut, with about 8000 inhabitants
IQALUIT—the city is on Baffin Island and only accessible by air and boat, subject to ice
IQALUIT—the city is on Baffin Island and only accessible by air and boat, subject to ice
IQALUIT—a wall mural with sea life and Inuit
IQALUIT—a wall mural with sea life and Inuit
IQALUIT—St. Jude's Cathedral is the seat of the Anglican Diocese of the Arctic
IQALUIT—St. Jude's Cathedral is the seat of the Anglican Diocese of the Arctic
IQALUIT—carved wood sculpture with Arctic animals and an igloo
IQALUIT—carved wood sculpture with Arctic animals and an igloo
IQALUIT—the surrounding tundra is covered with low flowering plant life
IQALUIT—the surrounding tundra is covered with low flowering plant life
IQALUIT—small example of colorful Arctic plants
IQALUIT—small example of colorful Arctic plants
IQALUIT—a forbidding place with its own stark beauty
IQALUIT—a forbidding place with its own stark beauty
RED BAY, LABRADOR, CANADA—a small (pop. 300) fishing village in a sheltered bay surrounded by red granite cliffs
RED BAY, LABRADOR, CANADA—a small (pop. 300) fishing village in a sheltered bay surrounded by red granite cliffs
RED BAY—small and quiet, there's not much to the town
RED BAY—small and quiet, there's not much to the town
RED BAY—between 1530 and the early 17th century, it was a major Basque whaling area
RED BAY—between 1530 and the early 17th century, it was a major Basque whaling area
RED BAY—the location of the sunken vessel San Juan (1565) is near the wreck of the Bernier, which grounded in 1966
RED BAY—the location of the sunken vessel San Juan (1565) is near the wreck of the Bernier, which grounded in 1966
RED BAY—debris washed up on the shore
RED BAY—debris washed up on the shore
RED BAY—pond on Saddle Island, offshore of the town
RED BAY—pond on Saddle Island, offshore of the town
RED BAY—140 whalers are buried on the island
RED BAY—140 whalers are buried on the island
RED BAY—tidal pools
RED BAY—tidal pools
RED BAY—an assortment of colorful plant life
RED BAY—an assortment of colorful plant life
RED BAY—and more tiny plants
RED BAY—and more tiny plants
RED BAY—a couple of seals perched on almost-submerged rocks checking us out
RED BAY—a couple of seals perched on almost-submerged rocks checking us out
L’ANSE AUX MEADOWS, NEWFOUNDLAND, CANADA—is an archaeological site on the northernmost tip of the Great Northern Peninsula, Newfoundland
L’ANSE AUX MEADOWS, NEWFOUNDLAND, CANADA—is an archaeological site on the northernmost tip of the Great Northern Peninsula, Newfoundland
L’ANSE AUX MEADOWS—the only confirmed Norse or Viking site in North America outside of the settlements found in Greenland
L’ANSE AUX MEADOWS—the only confirmed Norse or Viking site in North America outside of the settlements found in Greenland
L’ANSE AUX MEADOWS—seven reconstructed buildings with sod roofs make up the site
L’ANSE AUX MEADOWS—seven reconstructed buildings with sod roofs make up the site
L’ANSE AUX MEADOWS—sheep shelter
L’ANSE AUX MEADOWS—sheep shelter
L’ANSE AUX MEADOWS—a replica Viking ship rests inside one of the buildings
L’ANSE AUX MEADOWS—a replica Viking ship rests inside one of the buildings
L’ANSE AUX MEADOWS—this ship, the Snorri, sailed 1000 miles from Greenland to this site in 1998
L’ANSE AUX MEADOWS—this ship, the Snorri, sailed 1000 miles from Greenland to this site in 1998
L’ANSE AUX MEADOWS—in the longhouse, costumed reenactors give life to the artifacts inside
L’ANSE AUX MEADOWS—in the longhouse, costumed reenactors give life to the artifacts inside
L’ANSE AUX MEADOWS—cooking on the open hearth
L’ANSE AUX MEADOWS—cooking on the open hearth
L’ANSE AUX MEADOWS—a blacksmith shapes an iron hook
L’ANSE AUX MEADOWS—a blacksmith shapes an iron hook
L’ANSE AUX MEADOWS—demonstrating weaving
L’ANSE AUX MEADOWS—demonstrating weaving
L’ANSE AUX MEADOWS—a small chapel
L’ANSE AUX MEADOWS—a small chapel
L’ANSE AUX MEADOWS—raised outlines of the buildings of the original settlement circa 1000 CE
L’ANSE AUX MEADOWS—raised outlines of the buildings of the original settlement circa 1000 CE
L’ANSE AUX MEADOWS—Miss Moose ambled by, looking for a tasty snack
L’ANSE AUX MEADOWS—Miss Moose ambled by, looking for a tasty snack
L’ANSE AUX MEADOWS—imagine Leif Eriksson looking out over the shore
L’ANSE AUX MEADOWS—imagine Leif Eriksson looking out over the shore
TWILLINGATE, NEWFOUNDLAND, CANADA—once a thriving fishing settlement, it's one of the oldest ports in Newfoundland
TWILLINGATE, NEWFOUNDLAND, CANADA—once a thriving fishing settlement, it's one of the oldest ports in Newfoundland
TWILLINGATE—a manor house in town has been preserved as a museum on 19th century life
TWILLINGATE—a manor house in town has been preserved as a museum on 19th century life
TWILLINGATE—parlor in the manor house
TWILLINGATE—parlor in the manor house
TWILLINGATE—monument honoring local veterans of the two World Wars
TWILLINGATE—monument honoring local veterans of the two World Wars
TWILLINGATE—Long Point Lighthouse, completed 1876
TWILLINGATE—Long Point Lighthouse, completed 1876
TWILLINGATE—the rugged coast of east Newfoundland
TWILLINGATE—the rugged coast of east Newfoundland
TWILLINGATE—scenic ravines
TWILLINGATE—scenic ravines
TWILLINGATE—lots of plant life clinging to the rocks
TWILLINGATE—lots of plant life clinging to the rocks
TWILLINGATE—natural bonsai
TWILLINGATE—natural bonsai
TWILLINGATE—a tourist trap on the coast was actually quite an interesting stop
TWILLINGATE—a tourist trap on the coast was actually quite an interesting stop
TWILLINGATE—collection of antique tools
TWILLINGATE—collection of antique tools
TWILLINGATE—several buildings house displays of things associated with fishing
TWILLINGATE—several buildings house displays of things associated with fishing
TWILLINGATE—codfish
TWILLINGATE—codfish
TWILLINGATE—a frozen chunk of whale baleen, used by some whales to filter food from the sea water
TWILLINGATE—a frozen chunk of whale baleen, used by some whales to filter food from the sea water
TWILLINGATE—baleen was formerly used for buggy whips, backscratchers, and corset stays
TWILLINGATE—baleen was formerly used for buggy whips, backscratchers, and corset stays
TWILLINGATE—the skeletal head and chest of a whale was available for inspection
TWILLINGATE—the skeletal head and chest of a whale was available for inspection
TWILLINGATE—what Jonah saw
TWILLINGATE—what Jonah saw
TWILLINGATE—lovely little flower of Newfoundland
TWILLINGATE—lovely little flower of Newfoundland

51  PHOTOS

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